Book: The Oath of the Vayuputras
Author (?): Amish
Year: 2013

What’s worse than reading an impotent book? It’s being surrounded by people who defend it.

While the Shiva Trilogy started off with much promise, the final installment is a lesson in let down. For those who have read it, The Oath of the Vayuputras comes with anThe_Oath_of_the_Vayuputras onerous burden of spreading world peace—ensuring that people who haven’t started reading the Shiva Trilogy do not read it. And this review, is issued in public interest. I will make no commiserations about this piece of text and give it a benefit of doubt like I have done in past reviews. For a man who has supposedly written two ‘books’ that have ‘apparently’ gripped a lot of ‘readers’ should know how to finish off. Alas, that’s a great expectation.

This so-called story picks up from where The Secret of the Nagas left off. Shiva is on is way to convince the Meluhans to stop using the Somras else he will go to war with everyone who uses the Somras. In this hotch-potch of a story, there are numerous war scenes for some reason that is beyond me. The descriptions are lengthy and tiresome. You can easily skip pages after pages. The title is misleading because the mention of the Vayuputras is only in a fraction of pages. Shiva does not rise to the occasion as one would expect a man-turned-God to. All the characters are melting out of their skins. There is no decision-making about anything. And finally, an atom bomb that wasn’t supposed to be used consummates what is supposed to be a magnificent achievement. No, really. This book insults my intelligence and betrays the faith I put in this so-called banker called Amish. Reading The Oath of the Vayuputras has irked me for a multitude of reasons. It took away a lot of my time and patience. It put to dust all the credit the earlier books garnered, and it would be safe to say that it has disappointed all those people who started reading this trilogy at all.

I’ve written largely about Amish’s writing in the first review, and I don’t want to repeat. But here’s a logic that was thrown at me when I was reading this book—good writing is not essential to good story-telling. That’s akin to saying good ingredients are not essential to making a good dish. Well, I’ve made my point. I could rip apart this piece of text from one end to another, but I won’t spend a lot of time on it. All I can say for the purpose of reviewing this book is if you haven’t read the Shiva Trilogy do not read it. It’s not worth your time. And if you find people defending this series, you better find yourself a better reading standard.

Bookhad Review of The Secret of the Nagas

Bookhad Review of The Immortals of Meluha

Bookhad
(14.04.2013)

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